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Climate/ Ecosystem Mitigation/ Remediation – Role of Halophytes

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Climate/ Ecosystem Mitigation/ Remediation – Role of Halophytes

Dennis M. Bushnell

Chief Scientist

NASA Langley Research Center

Briefer Halophyte Activities….

  • Presentations at International Climate and water Forums
  • Extensive “Futures” briefs and publications explicating, advocating, extoling such
  • Through the tech advisor to Sec State, Halophyte site near Aswan, Egypt
  • Adviser to Boeing, their halophyte production of aviation fuels in the UAE
  • Worked with the Netherlands Plenipotentiary for Aruba, food, fuels from Halophytes on their desert eastern portion
  • Interactions with “Angel” investors, advisor to small Halophyte startups
  • Serve on the Advanced Power and Energy working group for the National Intelligence Council, where I explicate/ advocate Halophytes
  • Tried to interest The senate/ house energy committees, DOE/Golden, Dept. of Ag., The Academy – No joy….Things were just not bad enough quite yet

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NASA Langley Research Center

Source: https://www.ethicalmarkets.com/climate-ecosystem-mitigation-remediation-role-of-halophytes/

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The JUST Report: Why Child Care Is a Business Imperative

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Why Childcare is a Business Imperative

(Hill Street Studios – Getty Images)

We are in a critical moment for considering what it means to be a working parent, especially a working mom, in this country.

In a new survey with our partner the Harris Poll, we found that over the past year and a half of the pandemic, the majority of respondents have become painfully aware of the high cost of child care. Of those respondents, 41% said they or someone they know missed work to care for their kids, and 36% said they or someone they know left their job or switched to part-time work for the same reason.

Majorities agreed that companies have a responsibility to take care of the parents in their workforces through all nine benefits mentioned, including part-time or job-sharing opportunities (69%), flexible work schedules (68%), and discounted or subsidized caregiving like after-school care (58%).

There was also strong agreement on the need for public support, with a massive 78% in favor of a federal 12-week paid leave policy that employees could use to take care of not just children, but also a sick spouse or parent. This is interesting, given Congress yesterday marked up legislation supporting universal paid family leave.

Business leaders continue to grapple with this. Some have called for passing federal leave programs, including engaging in the dialogue in Congress about federal paid family leave policies. Leaders of companies like Etsy, Gap, Chobani, and Patagonia met recently with Vice President Kamala Harris to discuss child care, and a separate coalition of 300 companies – including Danone North America, Levi Strauss & Co., Pinterest, and Salesforce –has come out in support of passing paid leave in the spending bill.

Julie Kashen of the Century Foundation is a major proponent of passing both child care and paid leave policies, and in an interview with JUST pointed to 2019 research showing that $57 billion in earnings, productivity, and revenue is lost each year due to a lack of child care guarantees. “I think that became even more evident, and gave employers more of a stake in this, after the pandemic,” she said.

Source: https://www.ethicalmarkets.com/the-just-report-why-child-care-is-a-business-imperative/

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It’s boom times for cleantech

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Just last month, a pair of investment funds closed more than $12 billion of private equity funding for climate- or energy transition-related investments. I noted at the time that it was a welcome inflow of capital to an area that hadn’t seen much interest in years … or ever, really. I also wondered a bit where that money might go.

Now we know — or at least have a decent idea — thanks to Climate Tech VC’s review of funding in the first half of 2021. The newsletter’s authors tracked about $16 billion of funding in 1Q and 2Q 2021, including more than 250 individual deals across seven sectors: carbon, climate, consumer, energy, food and water, industrial, and mobility. That’s almost as much as all of 2020 and not far behind 2018’s total of $17.9 billion.

That big investment figure is noteworthy, but equally noteworthy is how investors are approaching the sector. Climate Tech VC splits its data in a very useful (if atypical) way: by the number of unique firms investing in each sector.

A decade ago, almost the entirety of investor interest in cleantech was electricity- (solar, wind), transport- (biofuels) or efficiency-related (a suite of software applications and software-as-a-service business models). Today? More venture firms are interested in food than anything else, by a wide margin. Next in investor interest is mobility, which, given that it includes everything from scooters to aviation, is a far broader category than transport fuel. The consumer sector, which was relatively minor a decade ago, is third.

Meanwhile, the leading sectors of 10 years ago are now laggards, at least in terms of the number of firms interested in backing early-stage companies and founders. To me that’s a very good thing, a sign of how much wind, solar, lithium-ion batteries, and some industrial service models have matured.

There’s also now a pleasing alignment between the number of firms interested in climate tech sectors and those sectors’ climate significance. Food and water is the single biggest category of emissions today; transport is third, only slightly behind the buildings sector, which consumes a great deal of both electricity and heat generated by fossil fuels.

Also noteworthy in Climate Tech VC’s data: Deal sizes in almost every tier of climate tech venture investing increased last year. Growth equity rounds, which fund major expansions and often involve building manufacturing capability and/or expanding to multiple markets, tripled on average to almost $400 million. With the two funds I mentioned in my earlier newsletter — TPG Rise Climate and the Brookfield Global Transition Fund — possibly closing as much as $20 billion in total this year between them, there looks to be plenty of interest in that cohort.

Again, all good news for climate. Here’s one more trend worth watching for both founders and investors: Climate Tech VC’s data show that seed funding sizes rose by a third in the past year, to $4 million from $3 million. But that relatively modest increase belies the valuations these startups have been tagged with once that fundraising is completed.

Last weekend, founder and early-stage investor Immad Akhund noted on Twitter that in the latest batch of Y Combinator startups he’d considered, “climate tech startups have the biggest premiums and are the hardest to get allocation in.” Nothing wrong with being a hot ticket, of course, though as veteran angel investor Joanne Wilson says of early-stage investing in general, “valuations have become out of control.” The median later-stage fundraise, meanwhile, is now taking place at a billion dollars.

Heady valuations and investor FOMO (fear of missing out) coupled with the very real need to fund planetary-scale innovation provide quite a tailwind for climate tech. Those outsize numbers are a sign of enthusiasm, but they’re also an implicit promise from founders to investors that their companies will grow to match expectations. Here’s hoping, for the climate’s sake, that a healthy number of highly-valued climate tech startups succeed in that.

Nathaniel Bullard is BloombergNEF’s Chief Content Officer.

Subscribe to Bloomberg.com for unlimited access to breaking news on climate and energy, data-driven reporting and graphics, Bloomberg Green magazine and more. You can read today’s newsletter on our website here.

That big investment figure is noteworthy, but equally noteworthy is how investors are approaching the sector. Climate Tech VC splits its data in a very useful (if atypical) way: by the number of unique firms investing in each sector.

Source: https://www.ethicalmarkets.com/its-boom-times-for-cleantech/

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It’s Arrived: Our ‘Uh-Oh’ Moment on Climate Change

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The jury (aka the IPCC) came back this week, and there’s no more denying it — everyone must do their part to help us avoid catastrophic climate change, and the time is now. Thankfully, our feeds remain full of companies working to do just that, in a variety of areas — including cutting ecommerce return waste, creating a climate-resilient wine industry, and fulfilling commitments to correct social inequities.

EDITORIAL

WALKING THE TALK

Beyond One-Off CSR: How Brands Can Combat Inequities Over the Long Term

Reversing ingrained social inequities is critical to achieving the UN SDGs and averting catastrophic climate change. The pandemic has laid bare the many costs of inequality — now is the time for brands to make good on their promises to address this global issue.

PRODUCT, SERVICE & DESIGN INNOVATION

Meet the Winemaker Working to Future-Proof Wine for a Climate-Challenged Future

The warming world is affecting all agricultural industries, with wine being no exception. New York’s Gotham Wines is banking on diversity and adaptability to strengthen the grapes and the industry, both socially and environmentally.

WASTE NOT

New Amazon Programs Aim to Curtail Rampant eCommerce Return Waste

With its size and scale and proper follow-through, Amazon has the potential to make a significant dent in global product waste and offer models for other retailers to follow.

THE NEXT ECONOMY

It’s Arrived: Our ‘Uh-Oh’ Moment on Climate Change

The latest IPCC report can’t be ignored — and it does our species and planet a disservice to pretend the situation will miraculously reverse itself. Here’s an overview and what companies should do in response.

COMMUNITY UPDATES

100+ Speakers, 75+ Sessions, 5 Unique Tracks at SB’21, October 18th-21st at Paradise Point

The SB’21 San Diego full program is available! Learn all the details–which industry visionaries will be gracing the Main Stage, which experts will be leading the Breakout Sessions, and where the best networking opportunities will be. Start building a day-by-day, hour-by-hour schedule of sessions and activities you won’t want to miss. You’ll bring back valuable insights for you and your organization that will help accelerate your sustainability journey. Don’t miss SB’21 San Diego, October 18th-21st.

SEE FULL PROGRAM

Source: https://www.ethicalmarkets.com/its-arrived-our-uh-oh-moment-on-climate-change/

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