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From The Editor’s Desk: Stopping To Smell The Tulips

It seems now that national politics has once again subsided into the dull affair it should be, America is in need of a new form of mass amusement, or outrage, depending on your outlook. The GameStop trading fiasco offered that in spades.

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It seems now that national politics has once again subsided into the dull affair it should be, America is in need of a new form of mass amusement, or outrage, depending on your outlook. The GameStop trading fiasco this week offered that in spades.

A very brief recap for anybody who somehow tuned it all out: This week, shares in video game retailer GameStop, AMC Theatres and other struggling brands soared as much as 400 percent as hordes of amateur stock traders coordinated on the Reddit forum r/WallStreetBets, TikTok and other online communities to drive the selected stocks higher — in some cases making a lot of money in a very short period of time, while also inflicting substantial financial losses on hedge funds that had taken out massive short positions on those stocks.

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Like one of the earliest known bubbles, tulip mania — the frenzied tulip bulb price runup and subsequent collapse that swept Holland in the early to mid-1600s — the r/WallStreetBets frenzy became a self-fulfilling prophecy, with more traders piling into stocks as their peers egged them on and prices soared ever higher. In the midst of it all, the day-trading app Robinhood temporarily blocked new purchases of GameStop and other stocks caught up in the volatility, drawing intense ire from retail investors as well as some political and business leaders.

By the time of this writing on Friday afternoon, Wall Street just closed out its worst performance in months and the large financial players are suddenly reckoning with the implications of the new “meme stock” phenomenon.

It’s hard not to view the GameStop fiasco as a classic David vs. Goliath fight: A group of little guys organizing en masse to stick it to some of Wall Street’s biggest and most sophisticated players.

In the midst of the fray, even arch-enemies Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz seemed to briefly agree on that point, with Cruz offering support to comments from AOC in which she said she wanted more information on Robinhood’s “decision to block retail investors from purchasing stock while hedge funds are freely able to trade the stock as they see fit.” (The consensus was short-lived: AOC swiftly reminded the senator of his role in the instigation of violence at the Capitol earlier this month and said she’d work with “almost any other GOP that aren’t trying to get me killed.”)

Chamath Palihapitiya, the billionaire tech investor, himself got in on the action this week, reportedly buying $125,000 worth of GameStop call options, turning a quick profit when his bet soared, then donating $500,000 to a fund to help small businesses struggling during the pandemic.

In an interview with CNBC afterward, he explained what he thought the movement was all about. He’d spent hours poring over the r/WallStreetBets forums, he said, and came to this conclusion: “What you’re seeing is essentially a pushback against the establishment in a really important way. … A lot of people, coming out of 2008, they took a lot of risk, and they left retail (investors) as the bag-holder. And a lot of these kids were in grade school or high school when that happened. They lost their homes, their parents lost their jobs, and they’ve always wondered, ‘Why did those folks get bailed out for taking on enormous amounts of risk, and nobody showed up to help my family?’”

Tesla CEO Elon Musk chimed in too, with a one-word encouragement to the traders on Tuesday: ”Gamestonk!!”

As for me, I’m with Chamath, AOC and Elon on this one. Yes, the r/WallStreetBets traders may largely be a crowd of lulz-seeking dudes engaging in risky day-trading. Yes, some people will undoubtedly lose their shirts as this roller coaster comes crashing back to Earth. The Reddit traders appear to be motivated by some dizzying combination of thrill-chasing and profit-seeking, a principled sense of schadenfreude about sticking it to crony capitalists, and a wistful nostalgia for relic brands like GameStop.

But you have to hand it to them: As Chamath also notes, many in the r/WallStreetBets crowd are actually doing more fundamental financial analysis on companies than many of the professional analysts who whisper in Wall Street’s ears. The Reddit traders were also savvy enough to see that some of the world’s largest hedge funds were leveraged to the hilt on certain stocks, and they figured out how to organize an army of traders to exploit that vulnerability.

As a result, Melvin Capital, one of the hedge funds that had shorted GameStop’s shares, was forced to get a bailout to the tune of $2.75 billion from other investors. D1 Capital Partners, reportedly one of 2020’s top-performing hedge funds, posted a 20 percent loss this month as its positions were hammered by day traders, according to Bloomberg reporting. Point72 Asset Management, a $19 billion hedge fund, is down as much as 15 percent since the start of the year, sources told Bloomberg, as a result of the meme stock trading.

Displaying a stunning lack of self-awareness, some of Wall Street’s wealthiest were quick to cry foul. Hedge fund billionaire Leon Cooperman went on CNBC to angrily lament the nerve of “people sitting at home, getting their checks from the government!” while trading stocks, a privilege that’s apparently reserved for him and his friends in the Hamptons. “It’s just a way of attacking wealthy people!” he yells.

Another clear loser in all this: Robinhood, the day-trading app where many of the Reddit traders make their trades. The platform incited outrage among users yesterday when it halted new purchases of shares in GameStop and about a dozen other volatile stocks. Further fanning the flames was speculation that the app had done so at least in part at the behest of Wall Street customers: Robinhood is able to offer free trades to retail users because it generates a large portion of its revenue from “order flow,” or the practice of essentially selling information about its user’s trades to hedge funds and other institutional investors before those trades are actually executed.

Robinhood CEO Vlad Tenev went on CNBC Thursday to explain the company’s reasons for halting trades — ”we absolutely did not do this at the direction of any market maker or hedge fund … The reason we did it is because Robinhood, as a brokerage firm, we have lots of financial requirements,” he said — but his comments did little to quell the outrage. The company went on to get a quick $1 billion funding infusion yesterday from prior venture investors including Sequoia Capital and Ribbit Capital to shore up its balance sheet.

Whatever Robinhood’s true reasons for halting those trades, the damage to its reputation and business will likely linger. An $11.7 billion unicorn that itself is moving toward a public listing, Robinhood took as its name a swashbuckling hero who took from the rich and gave to the poor. Its entire business is built on the (arguably misguided) notion that the common man should enjoy the same level of access to the public markets as sophisticated Wall Street institutions. And yet this week it undoubtedly tipped the scales back to the rich and powerful. It’s hard to see the heroism in that.

Illustration: Dom Guzman

Stay up to date with recent funding rounds, acquisitions, and more with the Crunchbase Daily.

It’s hard not to view the GameStop fiasco as a classic David vs. Goliath fight: A group of little guys organizing en masse to stick it to some of Wall Street’s biggest and most sophisticated players.

Source: https://news.crunchbase.com/news/gamestop-wallstreetbets-robinhood-trading/

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The Briefing: Snyk Gets $530M, Scalapay Raises $155M, And More

Crunchbase News’ top picks of the news to stay current in the VC and startup world.

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Here’s what you need to know today in startup and venture news, updated by the Crunchbase News staff throughout the day to keep you in the know.

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Snyk snags $530M at $8.5B valuation

Boston-based application security developer Snyk closed a $530 million Series F at a valuation of $8.5 billion—more than tripling its value since the beginning of 2021.

The round was co-led by Sands Capital Ventures and Tiger Global, with participation from new investors Baillie Gifford, Koch Industries, Lone Pine Capital, T. Rowe Price and Whale Rock Capital Management, and existing investors Accel, funds managed by BlackRock, Addition, Boldstart Ventures, Canaan Partners, Coatue, Salesforce Ventures1, Alkeon, Atlassian Ventures, Franklin Templeton, Geodesic Capital and Temasek.

The deal included both primary and secondary offerings with more than $300 million of new working capital.

Founded in 2015, the company has now raised a total of $775 million to date.

— Chris Metinko

Scalapay raises $155M

Milan-based buy now, pay later provider Scalapay raised $155 million as part of a Series A round led by Tiger Global, with participation from Baleen Capital and Woodson Capital.

The company allows buyers of fashion, furniture and other consumables to pay for their purchases over three installments.

Founded in 2019, the company currently offers its services in Italy, France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Finland, Belgium, Netherlands and Austria.

Fintech

Nuula lands $120M for small biz fintech: Toronto-based Nuula, developer of an app delivering business metrics and financial products for small businesses, raised $120 million in a debt and equity round. The financing includes $20 million in equity funding led by Edison Partners and a $100 million credit facility provided by funds managed by the credit group of Ares Management.

— Joanna Glasner

Health tech

• Flo raises $50M for women’s health app: London-based women’s health app Flo said this week that it has closed a $50 million Series B financing led by VNV Global and Target Global. Flo said it will use the new capital to hire more employees and for R&D into new product features. Its app focuses on women’s health and includes period, fertility and pregnancy tracking features. The company said its headcount has more than doubled in the last two years to 350 people and that it aims to have $100 million in ARR by the end of 2021.

Illustration: Dom Guzman

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Source: https://news.crunchbase.com/news/briefing-9-9-21/

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The Briefing: Reddit Reportedly Plans IPO, Iconiq Eyes SPAC Deal, And More

Crunchbase News’ top picks of the news to stay current in the VC and startup world.

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Here’s what you need to know today in startup and venture news, updated by the Crunchbase News staff throughout the day to keep you in the know.

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Reddit reportedly planning big IPO

Online discussion form Reddit is talking to investment banks and attorneys in preparation for a potential IPO in coming months, according to a Reuters report citing unnamed sources.

The company was reportedly valued around $10 billion in a private funding round last month. As a public company, Reddit is said to be seeking a valuation of more than $15 billion.

Founded in 2005, Reddit has raised at least $1.3 billion in known funding to date, per Crunchbase data, with the majority of investment occurring over the past two years.

Chinese EV maker Iconiq mulls SPAC listing

China-based electric vehicle maker Iconiq is in talks about potentially going public through a merger with a blank-check acquirer, according to a Bloomberg report citing unnamed sources. A deal could reportedly value the combined company at around $4 billion.

Funding rounds

Sunday raises $45M Series B: Bangkok-based Sunday, a tech-focused provider of insurance policies and underwriting, raised $45 million in a Series B financing backed by Tencent, SCB 10X, Vertex Ventures Southeast Asia & India, Quona Capital, Aflac Innovation Partners and Z Venture Capital.

— Joanna Glasner

Illustration: Dom Guzman

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Source: https://news.crunchbase.com/news/briefing-9-3-21/

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The Briefing: HeadSpin Co-Founder Charged, Headspace Merges With Ginger, And More

Crunchbase News’ top picks of the news to stay current in the VC and startup world.

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Here’s what you need to know today in startup and venture news, updated by the Crunchbase News staff throughout the day to keep you in the know.

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HeadSpin co-founder charged with defrauding investors

U.S. authorities charged the co-founder and former CEO of HeadSpin with defrauding investors out of as much as $80 million by overstating the financial numbers of the Palo Alto, California-based startup.

The U.S. Department of Justice arrested Manish Lachwani on charges of securities fraud and wire fraud related to raising money from investors. In a release, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said Lachwani is charged with defrauding investors by falsely claiming that the company had “achieved strong and consistent growth in acquiring customers and generating revenue.”

According to the SEC’s complaint, Lachwani is alleged to have engaged in a fraudulent scheme to push HeadSpin’s valuation to more than $1 billion by “falsely inflating the company’s key financial metrics and doctoring its internal sales records” from at least 2018 through 2020. The alleged fraud came to light after the company’s board of directors conducted an internal investigation which revised HeadSpin’s valuation down from $1.1 billion to $300 million.

Lachwani co-founded HeadSpin—a digital experience test platform—and acted as its CEO from its inception in 2015 until approximately May of last year.

— Chris Metinko

Headspace merges with Ginger

Headspace and Ginger, two startups focused on mental health and well-being, announced plans to merge into a single company named Headspace Health.

Santa Monica, California-based Headspace, known for its mindfulness and meditation apps, was founded in 2010 and has raised around $216 million in known funding to date. San Francisco-based Ginger, a provider of on-demand mental health coaching and therapy, was founded in 2011 and has raised around $220 million to date.

As Headspace Health, the two companies will serve consumers, employers and health plans, offering support for mental health symptoms from anxiety to depression to more complex diagnoses.

Cribl lands $200M Series C

San Francisco-based Cribl raised a $200 million Series C led by Greylock and Redpoint Ventures. The round also included new investor IVP, existing investors Sequoia and CRV and strategic investments from Citi Ventures and Crowdstrike.

Founded in 2017, Cribl helps companies manage their flow of data and route it to where it can be used best. The company has now raised a total of $254 million.

— Chris Metinko

Energy Vault raises $100M

Energy Vault, an energy storage technology provider, announced it has raised $100 million in a Series C funding round led by Prime Movers Lab. Based in Westlake, California, and Lugano, Switzerland, Energy Vault focuses on renewable energy storage products.

M&A

LexisNexis Risk Solutions to acquire Trunarrative: LexisNexis Risk Solutions announced that it is acquiring startup Trunarrative, for an undisclosed sum. Founded in 2016, Leeds, U.K.-based Trunarrative provides a cloud-based platform that detects and prevents financial crime and fraud.

— Joanna Glasner

Illustration: Dom Guzman

Stay up to date with recent funding rounds, acquisitions, and more with the Crunchbase Daily.

Source: https://news.crunchbase.com/news/briefing-8-25-21/

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