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Navy to Field Early ‘Project Overmatch’ Battle Network on Theodore Roosevelt CSG in 2023

The Navy envisions a future fleet with manned and unmanned ships, submarines and aircraft operating in a dispersed manner and collecting a ton of data to fill in a common operating picture – which operational commanders could then use to, if ever needed, have the best sensor platform send targeting data to the best shooter …

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operations in the U.S. Third Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Casey Scoular)","created_timestamp":"1608267600","copyright":"Public Domain","focal_length":"80","iso":"800","shutter_speed":"0.000125","title":"USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71)","orientation":"1"}” data-image-title=”USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71)” data-image-description=”” data-medium-file=”https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-320×187.jpg” data-large-file=”https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-660×386.jpg” src=”https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211.jpg” alt=”” width=”4384″ height=”2566″ srcset=”https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211.jpg 4384w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-320×187.jpg 320w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-768×450.jpg 768w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-660×386.jpg 660w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-150×88.jpg 150w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-1076×630.jpg 1076w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-200×117.jpg 200w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-250×146.jpg 250w, https://news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/6463211-624×365.jpg 624w” sizes=”(max-width: 4384px) 100vw, 4384px”>

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) transits the Pacific Ocean on Dec. 18, 2020. US Navy Photo

The Navy envisions a future fleet with manned and unmanned ships, submarines and aircraft operating in a dispersed manner and collecting a ton of data to fill in a common operating picture – which operational commanders could then use to, if ever needed, have the best sensor platform send targeting data to the best shooter to attack an enemy. That entire vision, though, would require a robust network that could withstand an enemy cyberattack; that could have enough bandwidth to manage video, voice, and targeting data coming and going; and could present a huge amount of data in a visual way that helps commanders make quick and good decisions.

As the service sets off to develop a massive Naval Operational Architecture (NOA) – including new networks, data standards and formats, battle management tools and more – by the end of the decade, the first slice of the pie will go out for operational testing with the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group in 2023, two admirals have said recently.

The chief of naval operations in October directed Rear Adm. Doug Small, the commander of the Naval Information Warfare Systems Command, to spearhead Project Overmatch, which will focus the Navy on the development of NOA by the end of the decade. Still, with the NOA effort having so many pieces, Small and his team at NAVWAR are focused more on the networks side of the effort through Project Overmatch, and Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Warfighting Requirements and Capabilities (OPNAV N9) Vice Adm. Jim Kilby and his team on the OPNAV staff are focused more on battle management aids that warfighters would use.

An E-2D Advanced Hawkeye, attached to the ‘Greyhawks’ of Airbourne Command and Control Squadron (VAW) 120, approaches USS Gerald R. Ford’s (CVN 78) flight deck during flight operations on Aug. 04, 2020. US Navy Photo

Kilby announced last fall that, as a first step on his side of developing NOA, the Navy would field a Battle Management Aid, known as BMA 2020, on USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70).

More recently, Kilby and Small announced that a first iteration of the network side would be fielded with the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group in 2023.

“When you have a project the size of Project Overmatch – sort of connect everything and bring [artificial intelligence] and [machine learning] to everything – you have to go at it in an agile manner. So step one for us was, let’s break this thing down into agile chunks and take a look at how – what are the things that we’re working on currently now that we can take advantage of and then grow from there,” Small said in late January at a virtual event hosted by the American Society of Naval Engineers.
“The first thing you want to do is get what you’d call a minimum viable product out there for people to be able to use. And you learn from it and while you’re building additional capabilities you at least have something out there to start with. And it’s a military usable set of capabilities. So that’s sort of the concept behind the minimum viable product. It consists of things like networks that are brought in as part of Overmatch, certain configurations of networking gear like CANES, certain sets of management aids and planners and things like that, and then defining data structures, right, for that first increment of capability.”

Fire Controlman (Aegis) 3rd Class Nia Anderson, from Hampton, Virginia, stands the missile system supervisor watch in the combat information center of the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG-60) during an anti-air warfare exercise on April 22, 2020. US Navy Photo

Small added that he didn’t want to get into the timeline for developing and fielding this piece of Project Overmatch but that “we’ll take some time to develop that and then get it out as it’s ready.”

Kilby, in a presentation last month at a virtual event hosted by the Surface Navy Association, said there are four overlapping pieces to the NOA effort: the networks, which fall under Project Overmatch; BMAs and other tools; data standards to allow for precision fires; and an infrastructure that would rely on cloud and edge computing.

Kilby said the Navy is committed to its Distributed Maritime Operations concept, but that can only work if the Navy successfully creates a NOA and develops concepts of operations that best leverage the unique advantages it would present – faster decisions, leveraging information from across the fleet, integrating manned and unmanned assets and more.

He said BMA 20 will provide a common-sight picture to everyone from the naval flight officer in an E-2D Advanced Hawkeye to the air team in the combat information center on a cruiser.

“It’s a step in the right direction, but we have a ways to go,” he said.

BMA 20 wasn’t built to align with the rest of NOA but would give a common picture that’s not available today and would help the fleet start learning how to operate with that kind of information at operators’ fingertips.

Similarly, Small said the network fielded with the TR CSG won’t be the final product but will help NAVWAR get fleet feedback to continue its development.

A SM-3 Block IIA is launched from the USS John Finn, an Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System-equipped destroyer, Nov. 16, 2020, as part of Flight Test Aegis Weapons System-44 (FTM-44). MDA Photo

“One of the key things about the effort that we’re doing here too is – I call it a fleet centered design. And so, beyond just going to the fleet and saying, ‘hey what are your requirements,’ – which of course we’ve done over and over and coordinating at deep technical levels on what is required for the fights today, frankly – we have partnered with other elements of the fleet to actually bring operators into the lab as we’re doing the development. So beyond the notion of [a minimum viable product] and when we ship it out, we’re actually bringing the operators into the lab,” Small said at the ASNE event.
“So even today, we’re having a discussion with the old like [joint interface control officers], right. How are you going to operate this sort of network of networks? And getting down to what are the tools required for you to be able to establish, maintain, fight, defend a network of networks. Very fleet-centric design, focusing on who is the one who actually has to take that information in and fight it and make sure that we’re meeting those needs early in development and then throughout development to include all of our test events, all of our live-virtual-constructive events, all that. So that by the time we do get any [minimum viable product] or any product out there, the design has been helped by the fleet before it even gets out there. So that’s really a key tenet of the project.”

Small said during a separate presentation at the SNA symposium that the challenge with network development wasn’t just that it had to include so many different kinds of sensors’ data and communication from different kinds of platforms. He said it also had to consider overall bandwidth needs during normal operations, as well as how to prioritize only the most important information during times when the Navy needed to keep quiet and practice strict signatures management. The network will need to be big enough to pass all information when that’s needed, but also smart enough to get top-priority information to its destination as fast as possible when one part of the network is down due to an attack or due to nodes going quiet to avoid detection.

An artist’s conception of the F-35 providing targeting data a missile. Lockheed Martin Image

Though the Navy has a lot of work to do this decade to make NOA a reality, Kilby said he was optimistic about the service’s ability to leverage past work.

“Some of you were active participants in the journey from an Aegis Combat System that purposely drove Aegis to an organic track, to today where we have an Aegis Combat System that is a critical member of the BMDS that accepts the best sensor data to close the fire control loop. The Ballistic Missile Defense System is truly a system of systems,” he said to the SNA audience.
“Similarly, Navy Integrated Fire Control is a system of systems approach to air defense. Smart and dedicated engineers worked across existing programs of record to provide a solution where the whole system is greater than the sum of its parts.”

“We’re not starting this journey from a cold start: we’ve been working towards it for some time. The introduction of [commercial off-the-shelf] hardware into Aegis and the development of a common source library have positioned us to take the next steps,” Kilby added.

Source: https://news.usni.org/2021/02/08/navy-to-field-early-project-overmatch-battle-network-on-theodore-roosevelt-csg-in-2023

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NSA Warns Public Networks are Hacker Hotbeds

Agency warns attackers targeting teleworkers to steal corporate data.

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Agency warns attackers targeting teleworkers to steal corporate data.

The U.S. National Security Agency is offering advice to security teams looking for wireless best practices to protect corporate networks and personal devices. The recommendations, while pedestrian in scope, do offer system administrators a solid cheat sheet to share with their work-from-home crowd and mobile workforces.

For starters the NSA, in a public service announcement posted on Thursday (PDF), urged security teams to be mindful of the wireless threats employees face when using Wi-Fi networks. It also lumps Bluetooth technology and Near Field Communications (NFC) into its list of worrisome protocols.

By now, café-based workers have likely mastered both public bathroom and Wi-Fi hotspot hygiene. But, for anyone who hasn’t the NSA advises: “Data sent over public Wi-Fi—especially open public Wi-Fi that does not require a password to access— is vulnerable to theft or manipulation.”

Advice also includes warnings of fake access points that can vacuum up user credentials and skim other personal data retrieved on the “evil twin” access points.

NSA Warns of Bluetooth

More interestingly, the agency cites Bluetooth as a convenient protocol for private use, but when used in public settings it can be a nasty security liability. The NSA advises turning off Bluetooth in public, lest a user be open to a range of attacks such as BlueBorne or BlueBugging – both used to access and exfiltrate corporate data on targeted devices.

Just last May, security researcher Fabian Braunlein with Positive Security identified Apple’s Send My Bluetooth exploit which allowed data to be exfiltrated from a device to an attacker-controlled Apple iCloud server.

Worrisome NFC

The NSA also touched on Near Field Communications (NFC), a handy tool for contactless payments. It said data transfer between devices using NFC can be a cybersecurity minefield of pitfalls. With just a tap data, is moved across a radio network from one device to another.

Andy Norton a cyber-risk officer with Armis told Threatpost security teams are lagging behind when it comes to securing NFC communications.

“Radio connected devices represents a huge risk blind spot for organizations,” Norton said. “These are very much the soft underbelly of information security controls –– the majority of energy, focus, and money from a cyber resilience perspective is spent on preventing attacks coming through the internet connected attack surface. Very little is being done to access the risk from near field radio connections.”

He added on just about every job his team finds a “rogue antenna device and shadow IT activity from antenna-enabled IoT devices.”

In its security bulletin, the NSA suggests:

  • Disable NFC feature when not needed (if possible).
  • Do not bring devices near other unknown electronic devices. (This can trigger automatic communication.)
  • Do not use NFC to communicate passwords or sensitive data.

“Users should consider additional security measures, including limiting/disabling device location features, using strong device passwords, and only using trusted device accessories, such as original charging cords,” said the NSA.

User Behavior Biggest Cybersecurity Challenge

The NSA’s wireless warnings, while basic, still go unheeded by too many. Sadly, the practical and basic advice still needs promoted, experts said.

“My fear is that the don’ts are ingrained, existing behaviors that are not easy to change and at times unavoidable,” Setu Kulkarni with NTT Application Security said. “For example, while it is easy to say ‘Do not bring devices near other unknown electronic devices,’ is that practical?”

Kulkarni added in an ideal world one key employee cybersecurity rule companies should have in place is keeping personal stuff of their business devices. Enforcing compliance gets much trickier.

“These tips are as relevant in 2021 as they were in 2015, but with the shift to more remote work, there are more people using public Wi-Fi,” said Tim Erlin with Tripwire. “While these tips are useful, it can be hard for the average user to understand how to implement them. There’s really a substantial amount of work here for the average user to comply with the recommended settings.”

Threatpost Webinar Series Worried about where the next attack is coming from? We’ve got your back. REGISTER NOW for our upcoming live webinar, How to Think Like a Threat Actor, in partnership with Uptycs on Aug. 17 at 11 AM EST and find out precisely where attackers are targeting you and how to get there first. Join host Becky Bracken and Uptycs researchers Amit Malik and Ashwin Vamshi on Aug. 17 at 11AM EST for this LIVE discussion.

By now, café-based workers have likely mastered both public bathroom and Wi-Fi hotspot hygiene. But, for anyone who hasn’t the NSA advises: “Data sent over public Wi-Fi—especially open public Wi-Fi that does not require a password to access— is vulnerable to theft or manipulation.”

Source: https://threatpost.com/nsa-warns-public-networks-are-hacker-hotbeds/168268/

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InStep Health’s Pharmacy Network Achieves Independent Certification to PoC3 Standards from BPA Worldwide

InStep Health, the Chicago-based point-of-care marketing company that connects pharmaceutical, OTC, and consumer brands with patients, consumers, and providers, announced it has achieved independent certification of its in-pharmacy shelf Media Display program for conformance to the Point of Care Communication Council’s (PoC3) Verification and Validation Guidance from BPA Worldwide’s iCompli Tech Assurance division.

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CHICAGO, July 14, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — InStep Health, the Chicago-based point-of-care marketing company that connects pharmaceutical, OTC, and consumer brands with patients, consumers, and providers, announced it has achieved independent certification of its in-pharmacy shelf Media Display program for conformance to the Point of Care Communication Council’s (PoC3) Verification and Validation Guidance from BPA Worldwide’s iCompli Tech Assurance division.

Point of Care Communication Council Verification & Validation Guidance Seal

Point of Care Communication Council Verification & Validation Guidance Seal

This seal gives our clients the added assurance their messaging is being seen – Rob Blazek, SVP, Networks & Analytics

“It was a pleasure working with the BPA team. Their ability to track through our documentation and understand our processes as quickly as they did was impressive,” Carrie Heisen, Vice President of Operations, InStep Health, said. “InStep Health has always abided by strict auditing standards. So, it is comforting to know the detailed processes our Operations teams take for every pharmacy program executed have been fully audited by BPA and validated by PoC3”.

BPA performed the InStep Health certification in accordance with PoC3 Guidelines. The PoC3 Compliance Certification process assures marketers and agencies that a PoC3 media vendor follows Verification and Validation Guidance.

“We congratulate InStep Health on earning third-party validation of their Point of Care pharmacy network,” said Richard Murphy, BPA’s Executive Vice President. “Their organization has made significant investments to obtain this certification, and we are glad to see their dedication and commitment to trust and transparency has been recognized.”

InStep Health, founded in 2002, built its business in the pharmacy from trust and transparency, two cornerstones of this sacred space.

“For years, our pharmacy Media Display programs have successfully served as a vehicle for our clients to communicate directly with consumers in the aisle while in a personal, wellness Mindset Moment. This validation provides brands further assurance their messaging is seen,” stated Rob Blazek, Instep Health’s RPh Senior Vice President of Networks and Analytics.

The Point of Care Communication Council was founded in 2013 to advocate for the effective use of the point-of-care channel to advance health and healthcare outcomes, ensure point of care continues to grow as a vital and innovative segment of healthcare marketing, and serve as a credible measurement of industry reach and revenues.

About InStep Health. InStep Health delivers a completely integrated platform to connect pharmaceutical, OTC, and CPG brands with patients, consumers, and providers in meaningful ways at every point of the health and wellness continuum.

We offer the only industry-leading, fully integrated healthcare marketing platform that combines the power of digital activation programs with a proprietary network of over 250k HCPs, working in over 177k offices and over 25k pharmacies nationwide.

Through our partnerships throughout the healthcare marketing sector, we have created 1000+ successful campaigns for over 250 brands. In-office, in-pharmacy, and digital solutions from InStep Health provide patients and consumers with the information they need to lead healthier lives.

Contact:
InStep Health Press Room
Sarah Chidalek, InStep Health
sarah.chidalek@instephealth.com
instephealth.com

About BPA Worldwide. BPA Worldwide is in the business of providing assurance. For 80+ years as a not-for profit assurance service provider, BPA was originally created by advertisers, advertising agencies and the media industry to audit audience claims used in the buying and selling of advertising. Today, in addition to auditing audience claims, through its BPA iCompli service, BPA verifies compliance to defined government, industry, and organizational standards as well as adherence to privacy, data protection and sustainability guidelines and best practices. Performing nearly 2,600 annual audits of media channels in over 20 countries, BPA is a trusted resource for compliance and assurance services.

Contact:
Glenn Schutz, BPA Worldwide
203-447-2873
gschutz@bpaww.com
bpaww.com

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SOURCE InStep Health

This seal gives our clients the added assurance their messaging is being seen – Rob Blazek, SVP, Networks & Analytics

Source: https://news.yahoo.com/instep-healths-pharmacy-network-achieves-181600421.html

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New Food Network competition challenges ice cream makers to create new & outrageous flavors in ‘Ben & Jerry’s: Clash of the Cones’

Six ice cream masters from across the country have been hand-picked for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: to create an original Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor of their own.

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Host Molly Yeh <a class=and judges Chris Rivard, Ali Tila and Jet Tila sample a competitor’s dish, as seen on `Ben and Jerry’s: Clash of the Cones.` (Food Network photo)”>

Host Molly Yeh and judges Chris Rivard, Ali Tila and Jet Tila sample a competitor’s dish, as seen on “Ben and Jerry’s: Clash of the Cones.” (Food Network photo)

Thu, Jul 8th 2021 10:10 pm

Premieres Monday, Aug. 16, on Food Network and discovery+

√ Hosted by Molly Yeh, four-episode stunt features special guests Kevin Bacon, Chris ‘Ludacris’ Bridges, Duff Goldman, Buddy Valastro, and Ben & Jerry

Six ice cream masters from across the country have been hand-picked for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: to create an original Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor of their own. “Ben & Jerry’s: Clash of the Cones,” a new primetime competition, premieres with a special 90-minute episode on Monday, Aug. 16 (9 p.m. ET/PT), on Food Network and discovery+.

Over four episodes, host Molly Yeh challenges the ice cream makers to capture the essence of a celebrity or pop culture icon in a new and innovative ice cream flavor, inspired by the direction given from the celebrity themselves. In each episode, the competitors use a specially constructed ice cream lab on the Ben & Jerry’s factory grounds in Waterbury, Vermont. After concocting their creations, the competitors hit the streets to have the public vote their favorite flavor, with the winner earning immunity from elimination.

Judges Jet and Ali Tila and Ben & Jerry’s “Flavor Guru” Chris Rivard determine which competitor was the least successful, sending that ice cream maker home and that flavor to the infamous “Ben & Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard.”

“Viewers are in for an imaginative and entertaining ride, watching along as these gifted ice cream makers create original Ben & Jerry’s flavors, based on inspiration from some of the biggest stars on the planet in food, music and film. This is the perfect show for the entire family to gather around and watch this summer,” said Courtney White, president of Food Network and Cooking Channel.

Celebrity inspirations include hip-hop icon and actor Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, Food Network’s Duff Goldman and Buddy Valastro, and actor Kevin Bacon. The ice cream makers compete for a chance to impress Ben & Jerry’s co-founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield for the grand prize of $20,000 – the exact amount Ben and Jerry hoped to make in their first year of business. The winner will also have the opportunity to have their flavor sampled by fans at an event in their hometown.

Fans can view the series on Food Network and stream on discovery+ with new episodes available weekly, beginning Aug. 16.

“We’ve made a few pints over the last 40 years,” Cohen said.

“We’re excited to see what these talented competitors come up with, keeping true to the euphoric chunks and swirls Ben & Jerry’s is known for,” Greenfield added. “It’s going to be great!”

In the premiere episode, six ice cream competitors are challenged to start their journey at the end, when they must resurrect flavors from the “Ben & Jerry’s Flavor Graveyard” to use in their creations. Then, Bacon challenges the competitors to make a flavor in his name that incorporates up to six degrees of ingredients. Other episodes feature the ice cream makers creating flavors after Ludacris’ favorite desserts, along with making classic ice cream sandwich cookies from scratch. And see what happens when the competitors base their ice cream flavors on Food Network stars Buddy and Duff.

In the finale, the final three ice cream masters meet the legends, as Cohen and Greenfield reveal their final challenge.

All the competitors need to do is follow the Ben & Jerry’s way: Be creative. Have fun. Make great ice cream. May the best flavor win. See which wildly imaginative frozen treat creams the competition and takes home the cold hard cash.

Fans can check out Food Network’s Facebook, Instagram and Twitter handles to get a closer look at each week’s winning flavor. Plus, Jet and Ali Tila will reimagine iconic Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors as desserts. Join the conversation all season using #ClashOfTheCones.

Source: https://www.wnypapers.com/news/article/current/2021/07/10/147290/new-food-network-competition-challenges-ice-cream-makers-to-create-new-outrageous-flavors-in-ben-jerrys-clash-of-the-cones

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