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Sony raises outlook amid home entertainment boom, but struggles to build more PS5s

Japan’s Sony Corp raised its full-year profit outlook by one-third, helped by pandemic-fuelled demand for games, movies and other content, but said it was struggling to build enough PlayStation 5 consoles amid a global shortage of semiconductors.

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TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp raised its full-year profit outlook by one-third, helped by pandemic-fuelled demand for games, movies and other content, but said it was struggling to build enough PlayStation 5 consoles amid a global shortage of semiconductors.

FILE PHOTO: Women wearing protective masks walk past a poster for hit animated movie “Demon Slayer”, distributed by Sony, in front of a movie theatre in Tokyo, Japan, December 13, 2020. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The electronics and entertainment conglomerate said on Wednesday some customers may have to wait longer for their consoles as it competes for chips with other businesses ranging from smartphone makers to car companies.

“It is difficult for us to increase production of the PS5 amid the shortage of semiconductors and other components,” Chief Financial Officer Hiroki Totoki said at a press briefing.

Sony expects to sell more than 7.6 million PS5 consoles by end-March, he added.

PS5, which sells for as much as $500, quickly sold out after its launch on online retail sites in the United States and Japan in November, thanks to demand for videogames from people stuck at home due to coronavirus lockdowns.

The shift to the new games console is also expected to encourage gamers to move to online downloads or subscription services, helping Sony boost the profitability of its gaming unit.

Sony now expects 940 billion yen ($8.95 billion) in operating profit in the 12 months through March compared with the 700 billion yen it previously forecast.

Totoki also said Sony had resumed some shipments of image sensors to customers in China from late November.

Sony had worried about the potential impact on its sensor business following U.S. restrictions on sales of chips using U.S. technology to Chinese smartphone maker Huawei Technologies Co Ltd.

In November, Huawei revealed plans to sell its budget-brand smartphone maker Honor. After the spin-off, Honor last month said it had signed deals with chip suppliers and component makers, including Sony.

Huawei was Sony’s second-largest image sensor customer after Apple Inc, accounting for about fifth of its $10 billion in sensor revenue, according to analysts.

Sony’s operating profit for the October-December quarter jumped 20% to 359.2 billion yen from a year ago, well past a consensus 179 billion yen estimate from six analysts surveyed by Refinitiv.

Historically better known for hardware like the Walkman music player and TVs, Sony has invested heavily in recent years in beefing up its entertainment offerings while streamlining its consumer electronics business.

This year it plans to close a factory in Malaysia which manufactures home audio equipment, headphones and other products.

Reporting by Tim Kelly; Editing by Kenneth Maxwell and Raju Gopalakrishnan

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Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-sony-results/sony-raises-profit-outlook-by-a-third-amid-coronavirus-home-entertainment-boom-idUSKBN2A30NG?il=0

Reuters

Southwest Airlines cancels 500 flights after computer glitch grounds fleet

Southwest Airlines (LUV.N) said on Tuesday it canceled about 500 flights and delayed hundreds of others after it was forced to temporarily halt operations over a computer issue — the second time in 24 hours it had been forced to stop flights.

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A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-800 plane is seen at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in the Greater Los Angeles Area, California, U.S., April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

WASHINGTON, June 15 (Reuters) – Southwest Airlines (LUV.N) said on Tuesday it canceled about 500 flights and delayed hundreds of others after it was forced to temporarily halt operations over a computer issue — the second time in 24 hours it had been forced to stop flights.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it had issued a temporary nationwide groundstop at the request of Southwest Airlines to resolve a computer reservation issue. The groundstop lasted about 45 minutes, and ended at 2:30 p.m. EDT (1830 GMT), it said.

Southwest said its operations were returning to normal. The issue was the result of “intermittent performance issues with our network connectivity.”

Southwest delayed nearly 1,300 flights on Tuesday, or 37% of its flights, according to flight tracker FlightAware.

Southwest Airlines earlier reported a separate issue that required a groundstop Monday evening after its “third-party weather data provider experienced intermittent performance issues … preventing transmission of weather information that is required to safely operate our aircraft.”

The airline said that issue affected several hundred flights and was resolved after 11 p.m. CDT Monday.

Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Leslie Adler

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Southwest Airlines earlier reported a separate issue that required a groundstop Monday evening after its “third-party weather data provider experienced intermittent performance issues … preventing transmission of weather information that is required to safely operate our aircraft.”

Source: https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/southwest-airlines-temporarily-halted-flights-over-computer-issue-2021-06-15/

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Thompson goes low to take lead at U.S. Women’s Open

A relaxed Lexi Thompson fired a flawless 66 at the Olympic Club on Saturday to vault to a one-stroke lead heading into the final round of the U.S. Women’s Open in San Francisco.

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Jun 5, 2021; San Francisco, California, USA; Yuka Saso plays a shot from a bunker on the third hole during the third round of the U.S. Women’s Open golf tournament at The Olympic Club. Mandatory Credit: Kelvin Kuo-USA TODAY Sports

A relaxed Lexi Thompson fired a flawless 66 at the Olympic Club on Saturday to vault to a one-stroke lead heading into the final round of the U.S. Women’s Open in San Francisco.

All facets of Thompson’s game were working as she carded her lowest round at the major in 15 appearances, sinking five birdies and gamely scrambling to avoid any bogeys to sit seven-under 206 for the tournament, one clear of Yuka Saso.

The popular American smiled and signed autographs as she walked the sloping Olympic Club’s Lake Course on a sunny day and said the work she has put in to improve her mental fitness was making a difference in her game.

“I haven’t played to my standards and I realized that I needed to change my mindset,” she told reporters.

“It was only hurting me. Obviously I needed to work on some technical things in my game and everything, but the mental side, I think, was really getting to me,” she said.

“I was just taking it way too seriously.”

Overnight leader Saso, 19, looked poised to run away with the tournament when she jumped out to a three-stroke lead but back-to-back bogeys on 13 and 14 opened the door for Thompson.

The Filipino player with an sharp short game pulled even with Thompson after completing a tough up-and-down on 17 but a bogey on the last left her in solo second place.

In the hunt at three-under were high school student Megha Ganne and 2019 champion Lee6 Jeong-eun, with the dangerous Shanshan Feng of China one shot further adrift.

Saso said she enjoyed the vocal support she received from the limited number of fans in attendance and said she was looking forward to her final round grouping with Thompson and friend Ganne.

“I’ll be rooting for her too,” Saso said with a laugh when she was told that Ganne had said that if she was not in the tournament, Ganne would be pulling for her fellow teenager.

“We have known each other for years, we played together in junior tournaments and she’s really nice.”

Ganne, the amateur turned talk of the tournament after she finished the first round as an unexpected co-leader, received rock star treatment from the fans in San Francisco and said she relished the spotlight.

“It was so fun,” she said.

“I’ve always imagined myself engaging with the fans like that because when I was younger and watching events, I loved it when I would see the pros just even look at the crowd or smile or do anything like that.

“So I really wanted to embody that today and I got a chance to on a few holes, which was nice.”

The 76th edition of the major marks the first time that it has been played at the iconic Olympic Club, a course that has hosted five men’s U.S. Opens.

The men’s U.S. Open will also be held in California this month at Southern California’s Torrey Pines.

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Source: https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sports/sun-finally-shines-us-womens-open-san-francisco-2021-06-05/

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Reuters

India reels under massive COVID wave | Pictures | Reuters

A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from COVID-19, on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021

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A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from COVID-19, on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from COVID-19, on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from COVID-19, on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

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Members of State Disaster Response Force (SDRF) patrol in the waters of Ganges river past shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

Members of State Disaster Response Force (SDRF) patrol in the waters of Ganges river past shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Members of State Disaster Response Force (SDRF) patrol in the waters of Ganges river past shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

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A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

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Relatives carry the body of a man for cremation after they, according to the relatives, were denied permission for his burial, past shallow sand graves of people on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

Relatives carry the body of a man for cremation after they, according to the relatives, were denied permission for his burial, past shallow sand graves of people on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India,…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Relatives carry the body of a man for cremation after they, according to the relatives, were denied permission for his burial, past shallow sand graves of people on the banks of the river Ganges in Shringaverpur on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

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Sumita Nashkar, 47, a woman suffering from COVID-19, receives oxygen support inside her house during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Sumita Nashkar, 47, a woman suffering from COVID-19, receives oxygen support inside her house during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Sumita Nashkar, 47, a woman suffering from COVID-19, receives oxygen support inside her house during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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Members of a medical team carry equipment and goods to set up a free medical camp to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Members of a medical team carry equipment and goods to set up a free medical camp to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Members of a medical team carry equipment and goods to set up a free medical camp to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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Chunilal Mondal, 60, a villager with a breathing difficulty receives oxygen support during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Chunilal Mondal, 60, a villager with a breathing difficulty receives oxygen support during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India,…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Chunilal Mondal, 60, a villager with a breathing difficulty receives oxygen support during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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Parul Mondal, 50, a woman suffering from COVID-19, receives oxygen support inside her house during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Parul Mondal, 50, a woman suffering from COVID-19, receives oxygen support inside her house during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Parul Mondal, 50, a woman suffering from COVID-19, receives oxygen support inside her house during a free medical camp set up to provide healthcare support to villagers at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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Dr. Ajoy Kr Mistary takes a COVID test swab from villager Boluram Mondal during a free medical camp at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Dr. Ajoy Kr Mistary takes a COVID test swab from villager Boluram Mondal during a free medical camp at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Dr. Ajoy Kr Mistary takes a COVID test swab from villager Boluram Mondal during a free medical camp at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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Villagers wait to receive medicine at a free medical camp at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Villagers wait to receive medicine at a free medical camp at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Villagers wait to receive medicine at a free medical camp at Debipur village in South 24 Parganas district in the eastern West Bengal state, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

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A message is written on the back of a medical staff member by a colleague at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

A message is written on the back of a medical staff member by a colleague at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021….more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

A message is written on the back of a medical staff member by a colleague at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

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Patients suffering from COVID-19 receive <a href=treatment inside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi”>

Patients suffering from COVID-19 receive treatment inside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Patients suffering from COVID-19 receive treatment inside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

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A doctor talks to a patient suffering from COVID-19 at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

A doctor talks to a patient suffering from COVID-19 at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

A doctor talks to a patient suffering from COVID-19 at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

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A medical worker feeds a patient suffering from COVID-19 inside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

A medical worker feeds a patient suffering from COVID-19 inside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

A medical worker feeds a patient suffering from COVID-19 inside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

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Medical workers talk as they stand outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward, where COVID patients are being treated, at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Medical workers talk as they stand outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward, where COVID patients are being treated, at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21,…more

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

Medical workers talk as they stand outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward, where COVID patients are being treated, at the Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

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A patient suffering from COVID-19, receives treatment inside a ward at Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

A patient suffering from COVID-19, receives treatment inside a ward at Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Reuters / Friday, May 21, 2021

A patient suffering from COVID-19, receives treatment inside a ward at Government Institute of Medical Sciences (GIMS) hospital, in Greater Noida on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

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Harveer Singh, 65, a villager suffering from COVID-19, rests in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air <a href=clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, in Jewar district, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India, May 16, 2021. In this village in northern India engulfed by COVID, the sick lie on cots under a tree, glucose drips hanging from a branch. Cows graze all around, while syringes and empty medicine packets are strewn on the ground.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui”>

Harveer Singh, 65, a villager suffering from COVID-19, rests in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, in Jewar district, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India, May 16, 2021. In this village…more

Reuters / Monday, May 17, 2021

Harveer Singh, 65, a villager suffering from COVID-19, rests in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, in Jewar district, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, India, May 16, 2021. In this village in northern India engulfed by COVID, the sick lie on cots under a tree, glucose drips hanging from a branch. Cows graze all around, while syringes and empty medicine packets are strewn on the ground.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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An infusion bag propped on a tree branch is seen at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. There is no doctor or health facility in Mewla Gopalgarh in India's most-populous state of Uttar Pradesh, a 90-minute drive from the national capital Delhi. There is a government hospital nearby but it has no available beds and the villagers say they cannot afford private clinics.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

An infusion bag propped on a tree branch is seen at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. There is no doctor or health facility in Mewla Gopalgarh in India’s most-populous state of Uttar Pradesh, a 90-minute drive from…more

Reuters / Monday, May 17, 2021

An infusion bag propped on a tree branch is seen at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. There is no doctor or health facility in Mewla Gopalgarh in India’s most-populous state of Uttar Pradesh, a 90-minute drive from the national capital Delhi. There is a government hospital nearby but it has no available beds and the villagers say they cannot afford private clinics.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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Harveer Singh, 65, a villager suffering from COVID-19 sits in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. Instead, village practitioners of alternative medicine have set up an open-air clinic where they distribute glucose and other remedies to patients with symptoms of COVID-19.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Harveer Singh, 65, a villager suffering from COVID-19 sits in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. Instead, village practitioners of alternative medicine have set up an open-air…more

Reuters / Monday, May 17, 2021

Harveer Singh, 65, a villager suffering from COVID-19 sits in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. Instead, village practitioners of alternative medicine have set up an open-air clinic where they distribute glucose and other remedies to patients with symptoms of COVID-19.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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Syringes that were used to inject medicine to treat villagers with breathing difficulties are seen at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. Some believe lying under the neem tree, known for its medicinal properties, will raise their oxygen levels. There is no scientific basis for this belief or for some of the other remedies being offered.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Syringes that were used to inject medicine to treat villagers with breathing difficulties are seen at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. Some believe lying under the neem tree, known for its medicinal properties,…more

Reuters / Monday, May 17, 2021

Syringes that were used to inject medicine to treat villagers with breathing difficulties are seen at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. Some believe lying under the neem tree, known for its medicinal properties, will raise their oxygen levels. There is no scientific basis for this belief or for some of the other remedies being offered.REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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Roshan Lal, 48, a villager with a breathing difficulty rests in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Roshan Lal, 48, a villager with a breathing difficulty rests in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

Reuters / Monday, May 17, 2021

Roshan Lal, 48, a villager with a breathing difficulty rests in a cot as he receives treatment at a makeshift open-air clinic in Mewla Gopalgarh village, May 16, 2021. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

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Volunteers Akshaya (R), 22, a law student, and Esther Mary, 41, a lecturer, carry the body of a person who died from COVID-19 for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

Volunteers Akshaya (R), 22, a law student, and Esther Mary, 41, a lecturer, carry the body of a person who died from COVID-19 for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

Reuters / Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Volunteers Akshaya (R), 22, a law student, and Esther Mary, 41, a lecturer, carry the body of a person who died from COVID-19 for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

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Akshaya, 22, a law student and a volunteer, walks to take shelter from rain after carrying the body of a person, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. Picture taken May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

Akshaya, 22, a law student and a volunteer, walks to take shelter from rain after carrying the body of a person, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. Picture taken May 18, 2021….more

Reuters / Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Akshaya, 22, a law student and a volunteer, walks to take shelter from rain after carrying the body of a person, who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. Picture taken May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

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Professional bikers Murthaza Junaid and his brother Muteeb Zoheb, who volunteer as ambulance drivers, don their protective suits before heading to carry a person with breathing difficulty to a hospital for treatment in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

Professional bikers Murthaza Junaid and his brother Muteeb Zoheb, who volunteer as ambulance drivers, don their protective suits before heading to carry a person with breathing difficulty to a hospital for treatment in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021….more

Reuters / Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Professional bikers Murthaza Junaid and his brother Muteeb Zoheb, who volunteer as ambulance drivers, don their protective suits before heading to carry a person with breathing difficulty to a hospital for treatment in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

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Akshay Mandlik, 37, a professor and volunteer, drinks water as he sits down after carrying the body of a person who died from COVID for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

Akshay Mandlik, 37, a professor and volunteer, drinks water as he sits down after carrying the body of a person who died from COVID for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

Reuters / Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Akshay Mandlik, 37, a professor and volunteer, drinks water as he sits down after carrying the body of a person who died from COVID for burial at a cemetery in Bengaluru, India, May 18, 2021. REUTERS/Samuel Rajkumar

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A view shows shallow sand graves of people, some of which are suspected to have died from the coronavirus, on the banks of the river Ganges in Phaphamau on the outskirts of Prayagraj, India, May 21, 2021. REUTERS/Ritesh Shukla

Source: https://www.reuters.com/news/picture/india-reels-under-massive-covid-wave-idUSRTXCIAI1

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