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U.N. aviation body to probe Belarus plane grounding, first report due by June 25

OTTAWA (Reuters) -The United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) agreed on Thursday to investigate the forced grounding of a Ryanair passenger plane in Minsk, an incident that prompted international outrage. ICAO’s 36-nation governing council acted after the United States and several allies demanded an investigation into the incident, which British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab called “a grave violation of international law.” ICAO would produce an interim report by June 25, said Irish Transport Minister Eamon Ryan.

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By David Ljunggren and Conor Humphries

OTTAWA (Reuters) -The United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) agreed on Thursday to investigate the forced grounding of a Ryanair passenger plane in Minsk, an incident that prompted international outrage.

ICAO’s 36-nation governing council acted after the United States and several allies demanded an investigation into the incident, which British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab called “a grave violation of international law.”

ICAO would produce an interim report by June 25, said Irish Transport Minister Eamon Ryan. ICAO said in a statement after the meeting that its council had expressed its “strong concern” about the incident.

The probe will be a fact-finding investigation designed mainly to determine whether international aviation rules were breached. ICAO has little scope to punish member states other than by suspending voting rights.

Belarus on Sunday scrambled a fighter and used a false bomb alert to divert the Irish airliner to Minsk and detain a dissident Belarusian journalist. The plane, traveling from Athens to Vilnius, was almost in Lithuanian air space when ordered to land.

“These unacceptable actions were an attack on European aviation security and put in danger the lives of the passengers and crew as they traveled between two EU capitals,” said Ryan.

Minsk, now facing calls for sanctions, rejected charges it acted illegally and accused the West of using the episode to wage “hybrid war” against it.

The council urged ICAO members to cooperate with the probe.

“They could not just close their eyes,” one person familiar with the meeting said, adding safety had been a key topic.

Two sources familiar with the meeting said Russia and China had both declined to support an investigation.

Russia, which has accused the West of hypocrisy, told delegates that what happened in Minsk was not an isolated incident and recalled reports that Washington had caused a jet thought to be carrying fugitive Edward Snowden to land in Austria in 2013, the sources said.

China argued for more time before taking action, one added.

Russian and Chinese diplomats did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Montreal-based ICAO wields clout through its safety and security standards, which are approved by its 192 member states.

“We wish to remind those who demanded we take punitive action against that country that our agency was never assigned that type of role or capability,” ICAO tweeted on Wednesday.

Belarus told the meeting the airliner had not been forced down by authorities and that the pilot could have landed in Lithuania, said a source familiar with what happened. The source requested anonymity given the sensitivity of the situation.

Under the Chicago Convention, each country has sovereignty over its own air space, but the treaty prohibits any use of civil aviation that may endanger safety.

A separate 1971 Montreal treaty to which Belarus is also a party outlaws the seizure of aircraft or knowingly communicating false information in a way that endangers aircraft safety.

(Reporting by David Ljunggren in Ottawa and Conor Humphries in DublinAdditional reporting by Tim Hepher in Paris, Andrius Sytas in Vilnius, Allison Lampert in Montreal, Tracy Rucinski in Chicago and Jamie Freed in Sydney;Editing by Pravin Char, Matthew Lewis and Gerry Doyle)

The probe will be a fact-finding investigation designed mainly to determine whether international aviation rules were breached. ICAO has little scope to punish member states other than by suspending voting rights.

Source: https://news.yahoo.com/u-n-aviation-body-discusses-152401449.html

Aviation

Shell Looks To Be Leader in SAF Production

Global petroleum producer Shell announced plans to begin production of approximately 2 million tonnes a year of sustainable aviation fuel by 2025.

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Global petroleum producer Shell announced plans to begin production of sustainable aviation fuel (SAF), adding approximately two million tonnes a year to the world’s SAF supply by 2025. Currently, the company distributes SAF produced by other companies.

The fuel giant last week made the final decision to commission the construction of a new biofuel production facility at its Netherlands energy and chemicals park in Rotterdam, which when completed would make it one of the industry’s leading SAF producers.

The news comes on the heels of a report generated by the company and Deloitte, which interviewed more than 100 aviation industry executives and experts who concluded that “the current global industry targets are not ambitious enough, and that the aviation sector should aim to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.” Shell also aims to have SAF equal to at least 10 percent of its global aviation fuel sales by 2030.

“Currently, [SAF] accounts for less than 0.1 percent of the world’s use of aviation fuel,” noted Shell Aviation president Anna Mascolo. “With the right policies, investments, and collaboration across the sector, we can accelerate aviation’s progress towards net-zero by 2050.”

Source: https://www3.ainonline.com/aviation-news/business-aviation/2021-09-20/shell-looks-be-leader-saf-production

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Vietcombank buys $3.6mn worth of new Vietnam Airlines shares

Most extensive and up to date airline knowledge base: More than 50,000 aircraft, 6,500 airports and 5,000 airlines, access to fleet lists, worldwide airline schedules and route networks, airline management contacts, airline capacity and frequency analysis, airline PSS directory, up to date airline and route network news.

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Vietcombank, a majority Vietnamese state-owned commercal bank, has signed up to buy 8.35 million shares in Vietnam Airlines (VN, Hanoi) in a deal expected to be worth VND83.5 billion (USD3.6 million), it announced in a stock exchange disclosure.

In the troubled flag carrier’s VND12 trillion dong (USD528 million) rescue package approved by the National Assembly last year, Vietnam Airlines was allowed to issue new shares worth VND8 trillion (USD352 million) to existing shareholders to raise capital.

With a shareholding of 14.8 million shares, Vietcombank’s acquisition of further 8.35 million is expected to conclude by September 17. That will take its stake to 23.1 million shares, equivalent to 1.044% of the airline’s charter capital.

Earlier this week, as previously reported, Vietnam’s sovereign wealth fund the State Capital Investment Corporation (SCIC) also bought into Vietnam Airlines’ rights offering as part of state-led efforts to save the airline. It paid VND6.89 trillion (USD303 million) to acquire 689.5 million shares, so that it now holds “at least 31.08% of Vietnam Airlines’ charter capital,” it said.

Nevertheless, Vietnam Airlines’ share price unexpectedly declined by 6.4% on September 15 after seven consecutive days of increase and continued to decline on September 16.

Nevertheless, Vietnam Airlines’ share price unexpectedly declined by 6.4% on September 15 after seven consecutive days of increase and continued to decline on September 16.

Source: https://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/news/107882

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Tuesday 7 September 2021 – Morning Call Top Aviation News Stories

Welcome to Morning Call for September 7, 2021, and the Top Aviation News Stories for today.  You can also search our Archives for older news stories by date.   AirInsight US Airline Index Commercial Aviation Delivery of Boeing Dreamliners delayed again amid regulatory scrutiny – The Hill COMAC: …

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Welcome to Morning Call for September 7, 2021, and the Top Aviation News Stories for today. You can also search our Archives for older news stories by date. AirInsight US Airline Index

Commercial Aviation

  • Delivery of Boeing Dreamliners delayed again amid regulatory scrutiny – The Hill
  • COMAC: Cumulative ARJ21 flight hours exceed 100,000 – CTC
  • Can Boeing build aeroplanes that fly? – Times of Malta
  • 737 MAX flyers win class cert in Boeing, Southwest RICO suit – Law360

Business Aviation

  • Embraer delivers 1,500th business jet, a Phenom 300E to Haute Aviation- Asian Aviation
  • Perspectives: Universal handling a ‘tremendous increase’ in charter – BAN

Airlines

  • Ryanair calls off negotiations on major order of Boeing 737 MAX10s – UPI
  • Is the recovery of travel demand about to fizzle out, or just experiencing a seasonal lull?- Forbes
  • Ethiopian Airlines settles with Boeing following 737 MAX crash and expects to fly the jet again by January – Seattle Times
  • How 9/11 changed travel forever – CNN
  • ‘Tesla of the skies’: This French start-up wants to take zero emissions electric aircraft mainstream – Euronews

Urban Air Mobility

  • EHang’s EH216 EVTOL and Falcon drone perform flight trials in Europe – Future Flight
  • UK Urban Air Mobility consortium publishes UAM guide for communities – UAM News

Social Media

  • Tunnel Flying – Twitter
  • Working on the flight deck of an aircraft carriers can be extremely dangerous! – The Aviationist

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Source: https://airinsight.com/tuesday-7-september-2021-morning-call-top-aviation-news-stories/

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